Fact-Checking Tip

When fact-checking (fiction or nonfiction, your document or someone else’s), watch out for restrictive words: always, every, never, only. Inevitably, there will be an outlier.

For example, did you know:

The best thing you can be as a fact-checker is skeptical. If something doesn’t sound quite right, research it using scientific sources (i.e., not Wikipedia), and if you need to make a change to someone else’s document, cite the source(s).

Article: “How to Tell Where You Are on the Burnout Continuum”

There’s a difference between a diligent pursuit of your goals and sacrificing your well-being for “success.” But that difference can be hard to see sometimes.

In the beginning, burnout often feels like moving in the right direction. You’re chasing your goals. You’re working towards success. Your flame is burning strong and you’re full of energy. The future seems bright.

Read more at Big Self School.

Article: ” Indie Publishers Cope with Covid-19″

Daniel Slager, CEO and publisher of Milkweed Editions in Minneapolis, reported that sales of Braiding Sweetgrass, a seven-year-old title by Robin Kimmerer, are “lifting revenues this year,” noting that the book, which calls for a return to a simpler life, has been on the New York Times bestseller list for trade paper for more than 16 consecutive weeks. Sales in all formats are 400,000 copies.

Overall, April saw a “dramatic slowdown” for Milkweed, Slager said, describing it as “a disappointment but not devastating.” May sales “soared,” he noted, and June is “robust.” He added that he was “moved by how committed [distributor] PGW and Ingram have been, right through the darkest days of the pandemic.”

Read more at Publishers Weekly.

Trusting Your Editor

When working with a client, I’m looking to create a collaboration, a joint effort, a partnership.

In short, I want to work with you, rather than for you.

This, of course, implies a level of trust, and I know that doesn’t come easily, especially if you’ve ever had a bad experience with another editor—or even no experience at all.

One simple way to build trust in your editor is to get an idea of their previous work experience, whether through their resume, references, or a list of other projects they’ve worked on. Do they turn in their work on time? Are they experienced in your project’s genre? Do they have a positive attitude? When you are able to verify that they know what they’re doing—and that people have good things to say about them—it can help calm your fears.

To build trust with your editor, be honest. From the beginning, you should let the editor know your timeline, your budget, your overall goal, and how hard you’re willing to work. Those should match the editor’s schedule, billing requirements, and skillset. The better the match, the better the outcome.

Finally, you can build trust between you and your editor by asking questions. I thrive when a client is eager to discuss ideas, put serious time into revisions, and/or ask about the changes I’m suggesting. All of those things show me how excited the client is, which in turn makes me excited!

Starting any new relationship can be scary, but working with a good editor should lift you up, make you believe in your work, and ultimately help you tackle the project at hand with confidence.