Article: “How to Copyedit The Atlantic”

If you’ve ever been curious about the copyediting process for magazines and journals, this is the article for you!

We start the process by reading each piece four times among ourselves. I might read the piece on my monitor, read it again on a printout, and then pass it to one of my fellow copy editors to repeat the process. We alternate reading onscreen and on page because we tend to catch different things with each method—stylistic errors jump out on the screen; timeline issues or abrupt shifts in narrative are clearer on the page. On my first read of Ross’s piece, for example, I flagged its abundance of metaphors: The satellite dish looked like an inverted mushroom cap and like God’s fingerprint; its surface looked like a taut bedsheet. Metaphors can bring vividness to image descriptions, of course, but like salt sprinkled over a finished dish, they’re best used in moderation. On the page, meanwhile, I found myself confused between the two extraterrestrial-research teams we mentioned, so I left a note asking the editor to clarify.

How to Copyedit The Atlantic by Karen Ostergren

Instagram for Writers

I’m currently working with a wonderful writer who is setting up her first Instagram account. It can seem intimidating, but if you’re not taking advantage of the unique social media platform, then you’re missing out. And once you get going, it’s nowhere near as complicated as you might think!

Here’s some help to get you started …

Marketing for Authors.

I’ve been conducting quite a bit of research on marketing over the past few months and was finally able to create my first marketing plan for a client. She’s happy to be my test subject for what works—and what doesn’t—in this business we call publishing.

If you’re feeling stuck when it comes to marketing your book(s), there are countless resources to help. Start here, and let me know what your experience has been like!

Grammarly.

Like me, you’ve likely seen ads for an editing product called Grammarly. This weekend, I took some time to research what kind of services the product offers, and after a lot of reading, I can definitely see some benefits, especially for non-native English speakers and those writing short pieces (e.g., blog posts, articles, etc.).

I don’t, however, think that Grammarly could replace a real-life editor for a more complicated projects (e.g., a novel, whether fiction or nonfiction). There are many reasons for this, including catching issues with continuity and point of view, and it turns out I’m not alone