Articles & Tips.

Article: “Zadie Smith’s 10 Rules of Writing”

Brain Pickings is an online “digest of the week’s most interesting and inspiring articles across art, science, philosophy, creativity, children’s books, and other strands of our search for truth, beauty, and meaning.”

This morning, I stumbled across an article on writer Zadie Smith:

“In the winter of 2010, inspired by Elmore Leonard’s 10 rules of writing published in The New York Times nearly a decade earlier, The Guardian reached out to some of today’s most celebrated authors and asked them to each offer his or her rules. My favorite is Zadie Smith’s list — an exquisite balance of the practical, the philosophical, and the poetic, and a fine addition to this ongoing omnibus of great writers’ advice on the craft.”

To read Smith’s rules for writing, click here, and once you’ve finished, spend some time perusing the thought-provoking, idea-filled site that is Brain Pickings to get empowered and encouraged for 2019!

Article: “How to Self-Publish a Book”

I’ve spent the last several years helping all kinds of authors—from brand-new to highly experienced—work through the intensive process of creating a book that is ready for publication. It’s been incredible to see the progress of these projects, and I sincerely believe I have one of the best jobs in the world!

If you’ve been wondering about the process—how to go from an idea through to a finished product—maybe 2019 is the year?

If so, self-publishing is one option to consider:

“Some people do come to self-publishing saying ‘I know this is right for me, I’m excited about it, I want to get my hands dirty and figure all this stuff out,’ and for some people it’s very much a backup,” Brooke Warner, co-founder of She Writes Press, explains. Although it’s perfectly fine to choose self-publishing after querying your book in the traditional publishing market, you shouldn’t go in thinking “Well, I couldn’t get an agent, so it looks like self-publishing is my only option.” Self-publishing should always be something you actively decide to do.

Article: “Some Nouns Have Too Many Plurals”

“Forming regular plural nouns in English is a pretty simple concept, but that’s where the simplicity ends. English has so many different irregular plurals — and so many different types! There are plurals that are identical to their singular versions (sheep: sheep), plurals that change for count and noncount nouns (fish: fish, fishes), plurals that have held on to their Old English or Middle English endings (child: children), plurals that retain the endings from their source languages (criterion: criteria), a whole slew of words with multiple acceptable plurals (index: indexes, indices), and that barely scratches the surface of irregular nouns.”

Read more of the article on Copyediting.com.

Podcast: “Tearing Down the Wall of Writer’s Block”

“Every author in the history of the written word has been there: Staring at a blank page, unable to break through the freezing fear of putting pen to paper. This writer’s block might go on for hours, days, or years, and even the most talented aren’t immune. Join Stephanie and Angela as they discuss strategies to help you tear down that wall.”

 

Source: Editor’s Corner Podcast, Dog Ear Publishing

Podcast: “How Editors Can Help at Every Stage”

“What exactly do editors do, and more importantly, how can we help you work through the writing process? Stephanie and Angela discuss the numerous facets of editing, from mentorship and motivation to story arc and character development to revisions and citations. No matter what phase of writing you’re in—and no matter what issues you’re facing—editors are here to help!”

Click here to listen to the podcast! 

Podcast: “Writing Children’s Books”

“Writing children’s books: How hard could it be? The truth is that because the typical children’s book ranges from thirty-two pages (picture books) to eighty pages (middle readers), it can actually be more challenging to write. Why? Because there is less content with which to communicate, meaning every word counts. Our discussion today includes the basics of writing for children: creating story and character arcs in a smaller spaces; why eye-catching, complimentary artwork is so important; why to avoid rhyming; and much, much more!”

Source: Editor’s Corner Podcast: Writing Children’s Books