Inspiration …

Whenever I start feeling harried, worn down, or just plain burned out, I look for a little help. Recently, I found Dr. Shelley Provost’s website. It’s filled with calming, inspiring, and motivating words of wisdom that will get you thinking more deeply about your life and what you want from it:

“Over the years, I’ve heard from many clients that they’re afraid the path they’ve chosen isn’t the right one. We are lured into thinking that the purpose of life equals upward social mobility, establishing a career, accumulating wealth, competing (and winning), and holding power. Even if we can admit to ourselves that we aren’t fulfilled with success’ trappings, all too often we cling to our illusions because they’re all we know.”

A thank-you …

To everyone I’ve worked with these past few years, thank you for making me a better editor and better human being. I know how very lucky I am to have a job I love and to meet clients who become friends …

Migraines and Work

While this isn’t related directly to editing, as a migraine sufferer (and I don’t use that term lightly), I know there are many of you who have been hit by these awful things while at work.

I was curious how people coped, and I found this article. I wanted to share, just in case anyone was looking for ideas.

I’m still learning my triggers (tech/text neck, most specifically), but right now, coffee and half an Excedrin are the only things that make a dent, along with a hefty dose of sleep (which isn’t always possible). Screen time of any kind is a complete no-go.

Got any other ideas to help with migraines? Leave them in the comments below!

Schedule for September

Just a friendly little reminder that I will be taking off most of the week of 9/9 – 9/14 from work.

Currently, I am booked through October 1, so if you have a project you’d like to discuss, give me a shout soon!

Article: “How to Copyedit The Atlantic”

If you’ve ever been curious about the copyediting process for magazines and journals, this is the article for you!

We start the process by reading each piece four times among ourselves. I might read the piece on my monitor, read it again on a printout, and then pass it to one of my fellow copy editors to repeat the process. We alternate reading onscreen and on page because we tend to catch different things with each method—stylistic errors jump out on the screen; timeline issues or abrupt shifts in narrative are clearer on the page. On my first read of Ross’s piece, for example, I flagged its abundance of metaphors: The satellite dish looked like an inverted mushroom cap and like God’s fingerprint; its surface looked like a taut bedsheet. Metaphors can bring vividness to image descriptions, of course, but like salt sprinkled over a finished dish, they’re best used in moderation. On the page, meanwhile, I found myself confused between the two extraterrestrial-research teams we mentioned, so I left a note asking the editor to clarify.

How to Copyedit The Atlantic by Karen Ostergren