Daring Greatly

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve likely at least heard the name Brené Brown. She’s “spent the past two decades studying courage, vulnerability, shame, and empathy.” What do any of those have to do with writing? Plenty.

Every one of you writers out there knows how much courage it takes to put a single word on the page, how vulnerable it makes you feel to pursue publishing those words, how much shame you feel when you get a “no” (how in the world do we not take that personally?!), and how much empathy you feel when you meet another writer struggling out there in the world.

So if you’re feeling a little low about it all, I highly recommend two things:

  1. Try reading one of Brown’s books, like Daring Greatly or The Power of Vulnerability.
  2. Watch one of Brown’s TED Talks or her new Netflix special, The Call to Courage.

You will find that you are not alone, you are not powerless, and you are not done!

Grammarly.

Like me, you’ve likely seen ads for an editing product called Grammarly. This weekend, I took some time to research what kind of services the product offers, and after a lot of reading, I can definitely see some benefits, especially for non-native English speakers and those writing short pieces (e.g., blog posts, articles, etc.).

I don’t, however, think that Grammarly could replace a real-life editor for a more complicated projects (e.g., a novel, whether fiction or nonfiction). There are many reasons for this, including catching issues with continuity and point of view, and it turns out I’m not alone

Article: “How to Self-Publish a Book”

I’ve spent the last several years helping all kinds of authors—from brand-new to highly experienced—work through the intensive process of creating a book that is ready for publication. It’s been incredible to see the progress of these projects, and I sincerely believe I have one of the best jobs in the world!

If you’ve been wondering about the process—how to go from an idea through to a finished product—maybe 2019 is the year?

If so, self-publishing is one option to consider:

“Some people do come to self-publishing saying ‘I know this is right for me, I’m excited about it, I want to get my hands dirty and figure all this stuff out,’ and for some people it’s very much a backup,” Brooke Warner, co-founder of She Writes Press, explains. Although it’s perfectly fine to choose self-publishing after querying your book in the traditional publishing market, you shouldn’t go in thinking “Well, I couldn’t get an agent, so it looks like self-publishing is my only option.” Self-publishing should always be something you actively decide to do.