Article: “Publishing Posthumously”

“When a loved one dies, so much is left behind, and sometimes, in the midst of mementos and other remembrances, there’s a manuscript tucked away. Maybe it’s complete, or maybe it’s only halfway there. Whatever the case, finding those papers is like discovering a treasure: a piece of someone we’ve lost that can bring them back to us, at least for a little while.”

Source: Editor’s Corner: Publishing Posthumously

Podcast: “That’s My Tense, and I’m Sticking to It”

“When speaking to others, we often switch tenses, especially when we’re excited. In writing, however, readers don’t have the benefit of hearing us speak or seeing our gestures and expressions, which means that a mix of past, present, and future tenses can leave readers incredibly confused. You can remedy the problem and avoid reader confusion with just a little planning and preparation, but maybe you’re unsure which you should choose in writing. if the topic of tenses makes you … well, tense … take heart! Stephanie and Angela are here to walk you through what you need to know, including an explanation of the six main types of tenses, how to choose the right tense for your book, and the best way to handle tricky situations like flashbacks and foreshadowing.”

To listen to the podcast, click here!

Article: “Building Your Writing Muscles”

“You’re out for a walk on a Sunday morning when it happens: An idea for a novel pops into your head. Excited, you rush back home, grab a pad of paper, and write. It feels electric, and the next morning, you want nothing more than to continue …

“But a sense of anxiety you just can’t shake prevents you from moving forward even an inch. You feel awful, your head swimming with shoulds and the overwhelming thought of Oh my goodness, I’m writing a book?! Once that sinks in, everything freezes, and pulling the next idea out from the mess seems impossible.”

Source: Editor’s Corner: Building Your Writing Muscles

Article: “The Organized Writer, Part I: Collecting Your Thoughts, Gathering Your Files, and Creating Backups”

“In this article, we’re deconstructing the nuts and bolts of brainstorming. After all, if you can’t think about your topic clearly, there’s no way you’re going to be able to write about it clearly.”

Source: Editor’s Corner: The Organized Writer, Part I: Collecting Your Thoughts, Gathering Your Files, and Creating Backups

The Basics: What Do Editors Want from Writers?

We want a good project. A diamond in the rough. Something we can really sink our teeth into and take from good to great. And we want writers who really, really want to see that happen.

Our favorite clients:

Most importantly, clients should understand that no editor anywhere in the entirety of the universe can make a book perfect. Why? Carol Fisher Saller (best-selling author of The Subversive Copy Editor) explains:

The manuscript doesn’t have to be perfect because perfect isn’t possible. There’s no Platonic ideal for that document, one ‘correct’ way for it to turn out, one perfect version hidden in the block of marble that it’s your job to discover by endless chipping away. It simply has to be the best you can make it in the time you’re given, free of true errors, rendered consistent in every way that the reader needs in order to understand and appreciate, and as close to your chosen style as is practical. (pg. 115)

Article: “The Basics of Self-Revision.”

“Completing a manuscript can feel like conquering Mt. Everest. Whether your work is fiction or nonfiction, minimalist or detailed, short-term or long, you want to raise your flag and shout to the world, ‘It’s done!’

“At Dog Ear Publishing, we say go ahead and celebrate! Pop that bottle of champagne you’ve been saving, turn up your favorite song obnoxiously loud and dance around the house, or involve yourself in any other merrymaking that allows the enormity of your accomplishment to sink in.

“When you’re done, however, it’s time to take a breath and remind yourself that although the first big hurdle is past, the journey is not over …”

Source: Editor’s Corner: The Basics of Self-Revision