Grammarly.

Like me, you’ve likely seen ads for an editing product called Grammarly. This weekend, I took some time to research what kind of services the product offers, and after a lot of reading, I can definitely see some benefits, especially for non-native English speakers and those writing short pieces (e.g., blog posts, articles, etc.).

I don’t, however, think that Grammarly could replace a real-life editor for a more complicated projects (e.g., a novel, whether fiction or nonfiction). There are many reasons for this, including catching issues with continuity and point of view, and it turns out I’m not alone

Article: “Developmental Editing: Recommended Reading”

“Reading writing craft books not only helps developmental editors stay on top of how writers are currently thinking about storytelling. It can also help us find new ways of explaining complex aspects of storytelling to an author.

Here are some of the writing craft books I recommend for both writers and developmental editors …

Article: “Error Rates in Editing”

“A shiny new book arrived by courier. I appreciated its weight, admired the cover art, braved removing the cellophane wrap, and turned to the copyright page to check for my name. Then, I slid the book onto a shelf, where it will stay. Whenever I break my ‘don’t look at a finished project’ rule, I invariably crack a book open at the one page with the lingering error. #faint”

Read more at Copyediting.com!

Article: “Zadie Smith’s 10 Rules of Writing”

Brain Pickings is an online “digest of the week’s most interesting and inspiring articles across art, science, philosophy, creativity, children’s books, and other strands of our search for truth, beauty, and meaning.”

This morning, I stumbled across an article on writer Zadie Smith:

“In the winter of 2010, inspired by Elmore Leonard’s 10 rules of writing published in The New York Times nearly a decade earlier, The Guardian reached out to some of today’s most celebrated authors and asked them to each offer his or her rules. My favorite is Zadie Smith’s list — an exquisite balance of the practical, the philosophical, and the poetic, and a fine addition to this ongoing omnibus of great writers’ advice on the craft.”

To read Smith’s rules for writing, click here, and once you’ve finished, spend some time perusing the thought-provoking, idea-filled site that is Brain Pickings to get empowered and encouraged for 2019!

Article: “How to Self-Publish a Book”

I’ve spent the last several years helping all kinds of authors—from brand-new to highly experienced—work through the intensive process of creating a book that is ready for publication. It’s been incredible to see the progress of these projects, and I sincerely believe I have one of the best jobs in the world!

If you’ve been wondering about the process—how to go from an idea through to a finished product—maybe 2019 is the year?

If so, self-publishing is one option to consider:

“Some people do come to self-publishing saying ‘I know this is right for me, I’m excited about it, I want to get my hands dirty and figure all this stuff out,’ and for some people it’s very much a backup,” Brooke Warner, co-founder of She Writes Press, explains. Although it’s perfectly fine to choose self-publishing after querying your book in the traditional publishing market, you shouldn’t go in thinking “Well, I couldn’t get an agent, so it looks like self-publishing is my only option.” Self-publishing should always be something you actively decide to do.

Podcast: “Tearing Down the Wall of Writer’s Block”

“Every author in the history of the written word has been there: Staring at a blank page, unable to break through the freezing fear of putting pen to paper. This writer’s block might go on for hours, days, or years, and even the most talented aren’t immune. Join Stephanie and Angela as they discuss strategies to help you tear down that wall.”

 

Source: Editor’s Corner Podcast, Dog Ear Publishing