Podcast: “Writing Children’s Books”

“Writing children’s books: How hard could it be? The truth is that because the typical children’s book ranges from thirty-two pages (picture books) to eighty pages (middle readers), it can actually be more challenging to write. Why? Because there is less content with which to communicate, meaning every word counts. Our discussion today includes the basics of writing for children: creating story and character arcs in a smaller spaces; why eye-catching, complimentary artwork is so important; why to avoid rhyming; and much, much more!”

Source: Editor’s Corner Podcast: Writing Children’s Books

The Audio Sessions: What to Do When You’re Stuck: Part 3.

In this series, we’re exploring an issue I see pretty often as an editor: getting stuck on the road to publishing your book and some of the reasons that might happen.

Today, finding the time to write.

 

Click here to download the .pdf “Finding Time.”

Practical Tools for Time Alone

Nothing in the world prepares you for the feelings that come the first time your kids walk out the door to stay with your ex-spouse. You expect to miss the little hellions, but the overwhelming anger, guilt, bitterness, and shame? Well, those can come as a total surprise.

Basically, it feels like your insides are being scooped out with a melon baller, one muscle at a time.

But your kids need and deserve time with their other parent, so you have to find a way to survive. This post is about that: you and me finding some creative ways to handle the time alone.

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Thriving Alone

During the first few months after a divorce or separation, it’s critical to take whatever time you need to get through the kaleidoscope of crap that boomerangs back every time you feel like you’ve come far enough to let it go.

Kid-less days are the best time to go for it, so use them to sob, scream, and rage clean to your heart’s content.

Then, when your kids return, hug them and tell them how glad you are to see them—and how glad you are they got to see their other parent (this part gets easier).

After those first months have passed, you’re going to find yourself in a strange place: sad to see the kids go, but … well, kind of glad too. Almost relieved. Because guess what?

 

When you’re sure they’re safe and happy, you no longer feel so guilty for the time apart. And when you happily shrug off the mantle of “parent,” you start to remember yourself.

 

Continue reading “Thriving Alone”