Article: “Children and Divorce: At Eight Years Old, His Family Shattered.”

“At eight years old, his family shattered. At nine, he left his house and friends to move to an apartment beside a busy road where dogs bark, kids shout, and he isn’t allowed to run inside because it might disturb the neighbors.

“But he isn’t concerned with childish things; he’s too afraid, too hurt. The first weekend he spends with his father is agony. He feels disloyal; he feels angry. When he says ‘Goodbye,’ his voice is breaking, and his mother later tells him, ‘If you need to live with your dad for a while, I’ll understand. We’ll work it out.’ ”

From Divorced Moms.

The Idea of Less.

Since this new year began, I’ve been working on the idea of less. Less work, less worry, less clutter. Just . . . less.

One of the hardest things about freelancing is taking time off. Ironically, it’s also one of the things that makes me so good at what I do: I don’t stop until the job is done.

Burnout is real, however, and when your yearly performance evaluation specifically brings up “overworking” and asks you to “continue striving to find balance,” the issue obviously needs to be addressed. I’ve spent the past month doing exactly that.

Continue reading “The Idea of Less.”

Meetings and Homeschooling: Options.

After publishing the post on working while homeschooling, I received several questions about meetings. How do I handle them while homeschooling a boy who is too young to stay home by himself?

The answer? It depends.

Continue reading “Meetings and Homeschooling: Options.”

Working & Homeschooling: a Realistic Approach.

I have homeschooled my son since he was in kindergarten. There have been many challenges, some of which I’ve documented, but overall, learning at home has helped my son thrive.

With so many changes this year, however, homeschooling began to feel impossible. Over the summer, I researched local school options heavily, asking questions and reading whatever I could get my hands on. Of course there would be trade-offs, but I had to be realistic. Working and homeschooling? I’m not Wonder Woman.

Learning the realities of the options I wanted for my son (a small, private school experienced in twice-exceptional kids) vs. what I could afford (the local public school and an IEP) was gutting. On top of that, my son was adamant about continuing to homeschool, no matter how much I explained that because I would be working in between teaching, we would not only have less frivolous time together during the week but he would also be more responsible for learning what was required of a 4th grader—and for keeping a good attitude toward schoolwork.

For me, working was no longer an option; it was a necessity. And we would both have to adjust accordingly. Continue reading “Working & Homeschooling: a Realistic Approach.”

Gaining from Loss (learning to be strong when there’s no other choice).

It isn’t my norm to post about personal goings-on here—except when they have the potential to help others. Then? I’m all for it.

Today I want to talk about something universal: learning to be strong when there’s no other choice. And right now, there is no other choice.

Continue reading “Gaining from Loss (learning to be strong when there’s no other choice).”