Article: “Everything You’ve Ever Wanted to Know about Copyediting in Less than 300 Words”

Some gems from this article on ACESeditors include:

• All you need to know about semicolons is that Shirley Jackson liked them.

• If it starts with a capital letter, look it up.

• People don’t need to nod their heads, they can just nod. What else are you going to nod, your elbow?

Article: “How Do I Know If My Writing Is Good?”

This is a common fear, especially in new writers, and you aren’t alone. But it might not be the right question to ask …

“Whether or not our writing is good is impossible to answer .”Because our writing will never be ‘good’ or ‘not good.’ It’s not a binary craft and there’s no singular moment when we magically become a ‘good’ writer.”



Grammarly.

Like me, you’ve likely seen ads for an editing product called Grammarly. This weekend, I took some time to research what kind of services the product offers, and after a lot of reading, I can definitely see some benefits, especially for non-native English speakers and those writing short pieces (e.g., blog posts, articles, etc.).

I don’t, however, think that Grammarly could replace a real-life editor for a more complicated projects (e.g., a novel, whether fiction or nonfiction). There are many reasons for this, including catching issues with continuity and point of view, and it turns out I’m not alone

Article: “Developmental Editing: Recommended Reading”

“Reading writing craft books not only helps developmental editors stay on top of how writers are currently thinking about storytelling. It can also help us find new ways of explaining complex aspects of storytelling to an author.

Here are some of the writing craft books I recommend for both writers and developmental editors …

Article: “Error Rates in Editing”

“A shiny new book arrived by courier. I appreciated its weight, admired the cover art, braved removing the cellophane wrap, and turned to the copyright page to check for my name. Then, I slid the book onto a shelf, where it will stay. Whenever I break my ‘don’t look at a finished project’ rule, I invariably crack a book open at the one page with the lingering error. #faint”

Read more at Copyediting.com!

Article: “How to Self-Publish a Book”

I’ve spent the last several years helping all kinds of authors—from brand-new to highly experienced—work through the intensive process of creating a book that is ready for publication. It’s been incredible to see the progress of these projects, and I sincerely believe I have one of the best jobs in the world!

If you’ve been wondering about the process—how to go from an idea through to a finished product—maybe 2019 is the year?

If so, self-publishing is one option to consider:

“Some people do come to self-publishing saying ‘I know this is right for me, I’m excited about it, I want to get my hands dirty and figure all this stuff out,’ and for some people it’s very much a backup,” Brooke Warner, co-founder of She Writes Press, explains. Although it’s perfectly fine to choose self-publishing after querying your book in the traditional publishing market, you shouldn’t go in thinking “Well, I couldn’t get an agent, so it looks like self-publishing is my only option.” Self-publishing should always be something you actively decide to do.